Upcoming Shows:

Sunday, November 23: Megaphones’ new EP release party at the 5 Spot (1006 Forrest Ave., Nashville, TN 37206) as part of the 5 Spot’s Sunday Night Soul Series | Doors at 6:00 pm, show at 7:00 pm; $10.00 (admission includes EP)

Nashville Scene: Pumpkin Ale Patch Critics’ Pick

Critics Pick Pumpkin Ale Patch

Jared and Kristyn Corder — the happy couple behind the recurring East Nashville Underground festivals as well as several other local-rock-centric events — are brave. They must be, as they’re opening up their home this weekend to beer-swilling horror and rock ’n’ roll fans for their second annual autumnal Pumpkin Ale Patch Fall Party. The soiree commences with a beer tasting at 7 p.m., when attendees are invited to “pick a small pumpkin” that “corresponds with a seasonal beer of your choice.” Not sure exactly what that means, but it sounds like a hoot. After that it’s rock ’n’ roll time, when dreamy psychedelic garage-pop outfit Churchyard, Brit-poppy Oklahoma transplants Twiggs, and blues-riffing guitarman Justin Kalk and his Justin Kalk Orchestra will offer the jams. Then it’s a screening of the seasonally obligatory classic, Halloween. Costumes are of course encouraged, and the event is 21-and-up. Good luck finding a more adorable hang tonight.
D. PATRICK RODGERS

Churchyard: Collaborative to the Core

Churchyard at Mercy Lounge 03

“[With Dead Legs] I learned how to front a band and be comfortable on stage,” writes Churchyard‘s Meghan D’Amico via email, the vocalist and guitarist reflecting on her time in the now-defunct four-piece. “Churchyard is different from Dead Legs because we are a band,” she continues. “We are both intentional and collaborative with our song writing.” The resulting sounds have been described as “lo-fi, grungy garage pop with more than a hint of ’60s psych, surf pop influence,” where Dead Legs’ sound blended “the Duke Spirit, the Dead Weather, Polly Jean Harvey and maybe a dash of the moodiness of the Dum Dum Girls all spliced together in some sort of Frankenstein experiment gone right.” When asked what the band was aiming for with the Ben Spinks-produced demos they released in late-2013, D’Amico says: a “very minimal” and “raw” sound. While each descriptor is accurate, they both fail to shed light on the group’s unique musical chemistry. Continue reading

Justin Kalk: A Stiff Necked Rocker

Justin Kalk

photo by Joseph Rini

Reading about Justin Kalk‘s musical development brings to mind something of an artistic trident: the first prong a reverence for the past, strengthened by an early introduction to instruments and past masters, enhanced by a formal musical education; the second, a tendency to experiment and take chances; and the third a dedication to always move forward. Somewhere at a crossroads between each of these elements is the new Justin Kalk Orchestra album, VoLcanO, though in keeping with the latter, despite having just released the new full-length, Kalk is already looking ahead to what’s next.

Speaking of his father via email, Kalk reflects being surrounded by music at an early age, “I remember crawling up to his Gibson 335 and strumming it back when it was taller then I was.” His great uncle taught him how to play lead guitar — early influences that still ring throughout Kalk’s music included Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, and Jeff Beck — and his grandparents would take him to jazz concerts at a young age, introducing him to many of the musicians along the way. While recognizing early on that music was going to be an essential part of his life, looking back Kalk says he had to fully invest himself in music if he was going to make something of his calling. “Berklee just seemed like the most logical next step if I was going to be serious.”

Continue reading